Enhance is Launching VaBroom on Kickstarter!

Dustpans are dirty, ineffective and frustrating.  Everybody has one and nobody likes it.  To us, they are the enemy.  That’s why we invented VaBroom. At Enhance we have a passion and drive to develop meaningful solutions that resonate with our customers.  We are curious, inquisitive, analytical, quirky, and sometimes a little edgy.  We enjoy the open collaboration with our clients and tend to push the boundaries of conventional thinking.  Our focus is to offer cost effective solutions with intrinsic value that create results. For nearly a decade, Enhance has been designing, developing, and licensing products. As we move into 2019 we have a new goal: bring products to market, direct to consumer. What does this mean? Previously, we have designed products and handed them off to other companies to manufacture, distribute, market and sell our designs in exchange for a royalty. Although this is a very successful model, after almost ten years in this game, we are ready to move into a new space and take on a new challenge. There was no question which product we would begin this new adventure with. It had to be VaBroom. The design had been tested and refined, the online surveys were complete, and since its conception, VaBroom has been a favorite of everyone at Enhance. The VaBroom is a lightweight, cleaning tool with built-in powerful suction that effectively eliminates the need for a dustpan. Sweep your mess of dust, dirt, and debris into a line or a pile with the broom head. Then, using the pressure activated nozzle, your mess is gone in seconds, thanks to the powerful vacuum suction. The easy-release...

The Most Popular Animals Used in Company Logos…and Why

In nearly every culture and industry, at any age and walk of life, you’ll find a reverence for our fury, scaly, cuddly, and sometimes creepy earthly companions―animals!  From cute little kitties to five headed dragons, marketers, designers, and story tellers have taken advantage of mankind’s admiration for an entire kingdom of these noble creatures. Magical mice, ninja reptiles―heck, even rampaging dinosaurs and have filled our books, screens, and cereal boxes since we can remember. No doubt corporate design has adapted any and all types of animals for branding purposes. Let’s take a look the most popular animals used in corporate logo design…and why! 10. Snake Snakes can be associated with both negative and positive characteristics. Speed and stealth are the most common attributes companies inspire to capture. From a graphic perspective, a snake’s long winding body can accommodate almost any design composition. 9. Bull You’ll see branding that uses a bull when a company wants to reflect power, strength, and momentum. A broad base and curving pointed horns, the aesthetic of the bull’s head also provides an interesting use of space for accompanying text or graphic elements. 8. Domestic Dog Domestic dogs are commonly used (outside of pet products) because of their relatability ―especially in a residential context. Dogs are associated with being loyal, playful, and often used in the action of fetching or bringing you something. 7. Crocodile/Alligator A well-known animal figure that can portray tough, ridged, and secure qualities. Since they are creatures of both aqueous and dry terrain, they may also represent brands intended to withstand many elements; literally or metaphorically. 6. Elephant The largest land...
7 Ingredients to Creating Successful As Seen on TV Products

7 Ingredients to Creating Successful As Seen on TV Products

By: Trevor Lambert President of Enhance Product Development, Inc. With the rising level of customer sophistication and the widespread use of Amazon reviews, the days of huge profits for subpar products in direct response is quickly coming to an end. Gimmicks are quickly identified as such and once exposed these products rarely make it to retail. If they do, they are doomed to fail quickly, afflicted by the weight of returns and a negative reputation. More than ever before, companies launching products in As Seen on TV must adopt a proactive approach at product development to complement their marketing systems. Successful product development results in products that function as advertised, leading to positive customer experience, 5-star reviews and a longer life cycle. At Enhance Product Development, we’ve made it our mission to create long lasting product rollouts by adhering to sound principles of inventing and design, resulting in hits such as True Touch and Hover Cover. Much of our process is proprietary, but here are some key ingredients and considerations for companies and inventors as they develop new products in the As Seen on TV category. Identify pain points as product opportunities. The best new products provide customers with meaningful solutions that alleviate painful problems in an innovative way.  With that in mind, the first stage of inventing is to uncover a common problem consumers are facing.  As easy as that sounds, this is often half the work in inventing!  Once you develop the habit of observing pain points as potential new products, your opportunities for creating meaningful products greatly increase.  It has become an obsession for our team,...
5 Common Design Mistakes and Misconceptions

5 Common Design Mistakes and Misconceptions

A Good Idea = A Good Product Not necessarily. To generalize it in saying all good ideas make good products is false. While it is important to start out with an idea, either good or bad, it is not until you get through the development of it that you soon realize whether it makes a good or bad product. Product Features vs. Function Another common mistake when it comes to design is to label and call attention to the product features but not giving thought to how it would function and be used by the mass audience.  For instance, take the laptop. It is a folding computer. Folding is a feature of the product, but does it have to fold? The better description would be a “portable computer.” It could mean tablet, smartphone, or laptop. It opens up the possibilities in how we use the product and in the end helps define how it is used. Falling In Love with a Solution Another common mistake that most of us have fallen victim to is latching on to one idea or to a name of a product. This can severely limit the creativity and mindset towards the product, especially if it is your own idea or name. By doing so, you are not able to let go and look outside the box. You have to look at a project from an objective perspective. In order to develop and progress through the process you have to try and fail, a lot. It won’t just happen. So by removing your favoritism and love for a product or name you are able to...
Overalls: 100+ Patents but Still a Questionable Fashion Statement

Overalls: 100+ Patents but Still a Questionable Fashion Statement

After a few good runs throughout fashion history, overalls took another well-deserved hiatus in the post-Backstreet 2000s. But they’re making another comeback—like it or not. You might not think much of the distinctive one-piece garment but there are over 100 overall-related patents registered with the US Patent Office. The trouser-style overalls design has seen several alterations and improvements since its origin in the late 1700s. During the 1800s, the trouser-style was improved with various versions of a suspender feature, essentially adding a strap option to the trousers. In the 1850s, these suspender variations had transformed into the classic bib style we imagine when referring to overalls today, though patents for this feature did not appear for another decade. Elements of the overalls, like the copper rivets, bib pocket, and buckle loops were patented to improve the utility of the garment, but are now iconic features of modern day overalls. Iconic features: Rivets: These little copper accents are not just for looks—copper rivets were patented in 1873, invented by Jacob Davis to strengthen canvas pants. Buckle loop/clasp: Originally, the suspender style overalls used a button to secure the “straps” to the waist and bib of the garment. A shift from the late 1800s to early 1900s introduced more and more loop or clasp fastener variations, causing an influx of associated patents. Bib pocket: Around 1915 the centered bib pocket appeared. Patents indicated this should be used for tools and personal belongings. Some of the variations included separate compartments with specific intent for items like a watch or handkerchief. Game day design: Patented in 2005, this bold, vertically-striped game day design...